Large study on health benefits of coffee consumption

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There is an increasing awareness about the impact of food and drinks on health, and particularly the effect on mortality. Coffee is likely to be the most commonly consumed beverage worldwide.

A previous report has shown that coffee consumption was not linearly associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease, with a lower risk at 3-5 cups per day.

This new study, which included more than 200,000 participants in 3 large cohort studies, and presented at the 12th Annual Congress of the European Cardiac Arrhythmia Society, has shown a reduction in total mortality associated with coffee consumption in the whole population related to cardiovascular disease with no effect on cancer.

Abstract
Background: The association between consumption of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and risk of mortality remains inconclusive.
Methods and Results: We examined the associations of consumption of total, caffeinated, and decaffeinated coffee with risk of subsequent total and cause-specific mortality among 74,890 women in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS), 93,054 women in the NHS 2, and 40,557 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Coffee consumption was assessed at baseline using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. During 4,690,072 person-years of follow-up, 19,524 women and 12,432 men died. Consumption of total, caffeinated, and decaffeinated coffee were non-linearly associated with mortality. Compared to non-drinkers, coffee consumption one to five cups/d was associated with lower risk of mortality, while coffee consumption more than five cups/d was not associated with risk of mortality. However, when restricting to never smokers, compared to non-drinkers, the HRs of mortality were 0.94 (0.89 to 0.99) for 1 cup/d, 0.92 (0.87 to 0.97) for 1.1-3 cups/d, 0.85 (0.79 to 0.92) for 3.1-5 cups/d, and 0.88 (0.78 to 0.99) for > 5 cups/d (p for non-linearity = 0.32; p for trend < 0.001). Significant inverse associations were observed for caffeinated (p for trend < 0.001) and decaffeinated coffee (p for trend = 0.022). Significant inverse associations were observed between coffee consumption and deaths due to cardiovascular disease, neurological diseases, and suicide. No significant association between coffee consumption and total cancer mortality was found.
Conclusions: Higher consumption of total coffee, caffeinated coffee, and decaffeinated coffee was associated with lower risk of total mortality.

ECAS material Circulation abstract

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