CRISPR targets and kills blood cancer cells

Organisation: Position: Deadline Date: Location:

Melbourne researchers have developed a new genome editing technology that can target and kill blood cancer cells with high accuracy. Using the technology, researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Australia were able to kill human lymphoma cells by locating and deleting an essential gene for cancer cell survival. The research provides a "proof of concept" for using the technology as a direct treatment for human diseases arising from genetic "errors".

Dr Brandon Aubrey, Dr Gemma Kelly and Dr Marco Herold adapted the technology, called CRISPR, to specifically mimic and study blood cancers. Aubrey, who is also a haematologist at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, said the team used the CRISPR technology to target and directly manipulate genes in blood cancer cells.

"Using pre-clinical models, we were able to kill human Burkitt lymphoma cells by deleting MCL-1, a gene that has been shown to keep cancer cells alive," he said. "Our study showed that the CRISPR technology can directly kill cancer cells by targeting factors that are essential for their survival and growth. As a clinician, it is very exciting to see the prospect of new technology that could in the future provide new treatment options for cancer patients."

The CRISPR/Cas9 system works by efficiently locating and targeting particular genes of interest in the whole genome. It can either target the gene to introduce mutations that make the gene non-functional, or introduce changes that make mutated genes function normally again. Herold said pharmaceutical companies around the world were already investing millions of dollars to develop CRISPR as a tool for treating genetic diseases such as cancer. "There is a lot of excitement and a significant amount of resources being invested worldwide to use CRISPR technology for treating patients," Herold said. "The technology can directly target any gene in the person’s genome, therefore overcoming many common drug development problems."

"In our study, we showed for the first time that it is possible for CRISPR technology to be used in cancer therapy, however CRISPR is a unique approach that could potentially be used for treating any disease that is caused by genetic mutations. The speed at which we are now able to make specific changes in the DNA will also accelerate basic research discoveries in the lab," Herold said.

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research material Cell Reports abstract

Receive Medical Brief's free weekly e-newsletter



Related Posts

Thank you for subscribing to MedicalBrief


MedicalBrief is Africa’s premier medical news and research weekly newsletter. MedicalBrief is published every Thursday and delivered free of charge by email to over 33 000 health professionals.

Please consider completing the form below. The information you supply is optional and will only be used to compile a demographic profile of our subscribers. Your personal details will never be shared with a third party.


Thank you for taking the time to complete the form.