-->

Oral hygiene linked to lower risk AF and heart failure

Organisation: Position: Deadline Date: Location:

Improved oral hygiene care was associated with decreased risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) and heart failure, found a large Korean study.

The retrospective cohort study enrolled 161,286 participants of the Korean National Health Insurance System aged 40 to 79 with no history of atrial fibrillation or heart failure. Participants underwent a routine medical examination between 2003 and 2004. Information was collected on height, weight, laboratory tests, illnesses, lifestyle, oral health, and oral hygiene behaviours.

During a median follow-up of 10.5 years, 4,911 (3.0%) participants developed atrial fibrillation and 7,971 (4.9%) developed heart failure.

Tooth brushing three or more times a day was associated with a 10% lower risk of atrial fibrillation and a 12% lower risk of heart failure during 10.5-year follow up. The findings were independent of a number of factors including age, sex, socioeconomic status, regular exercise, alcohol consumption, body mass index, and comorbidities such as hypertension.

While the study did not investigate mechanisms, one possibility is that frequent tooth brushing reduces bacteria in the subgingival biofilm (bacteria living in the pocket between the teeth and gums), thereby preventing translocation to the bloodstream.

Senior author Dr Tae-Jin Song of Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea noted that the analysis was limited to one country and as an observational study does not prove causation. But he added: “We studied a large group over a long period, which adds strength to our findings.”

An accompanying editorial states: “It is certainly too early to recommend tooth brushing for the prevention of atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure.” It adds: “While the role of inflammation in the occurrence of cardiovascular disease is becoming more and more evident, intervention studies are needed to define strategies of public health importance.”

Abstract
Aims: Poor oral hygiene can provoke transient bacteremia and systemic inflammation, a mediator of atrial fibrillation and heart failure. This study aims to investigate association of oral hygiene indicators with atrial fibrillation and heart failure risk in Korea.
Methods: We included 161,286 subjects from the National Health Insurance System-Health Screening Cohort who had no missing data for demographics, past history, or laboratory findings. They had no history of atrial fibrillation, heart failure, or cardiac valvular diseases. For oral hygiene indicators, presence of periodontal disease, number of tooth brushings, any reasons of dental visit, professional dental cleaning, and number of missing teeth were investigated.

Results: During median follow-up of 10.5 years, 4911 (3.0%) cases of atrial fibrillation and 7971 (4.9%) cases of heart failure occurred. In multivariate analysis after adjusting age, sex, socioeconomic status, regular exercise, alcohol consumption, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, current smoking, renal disease, history of cancer, systolic blood pressure, blood and urine laboratory findings, frequent tooth brushing (≥3 times/day) was significantly associated with attenuated risk of atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio: 0.90, 95% confidence interval (0.83–0.98)) and heart failure (0.88, (0.82–0.94)). Professional dental cleaning was negatively (0.93, (0.88–0.99)), while number of missing teeth ≥22 was positively (1.32, (1.11–1.56)) associated with risk of heart failure.
Conclusion: Improved oral hygiene care was associated with decreased risk of atrial fibrillation and heart failure. Healthier oral hygiene by frequent tooth brushing and professional dental cleaning may reduce risk of atrial fibrillation and heart failure.

Authors
Yoonkyung Chang, Ho Geol Woo, Jin Park, Ji Sung Lee, Tae-Jin Song

European Society of Cardiology material

European Journal of Preventative Cardiology abstract

Receive Medical Brief's free weekly e-newsletter



Related Posts

Thank you for subscribing to MedicalBrief


MedicalBrief is Africa’s premier medical news and research weekly newsletter. MedicalBrief is published every Thursday and delivered free of charge by email to over 33 000 health professionals.

Please consider completing the form below. The information you supply is optional and will only be used to compile a demographic profile of our subscribers. Your personal details will never be shared with a third party.


Thank you for taking the time to complete the form.