Saturday, 16 October, 2021
HomePsychology

Psychology

Long-lasting benefits of using meditation to sustain attention

Gains in the ability to sustain attention developed through intensive meditation training are maintained up to seven years later, reports a study is based...

Husbands more prone to illness when wives are primary breadwinners

US men whose female partners are the primary bread-winners in their families are more likely to suffer from conditions such as lung diseases, ulcers...

Meditation helps attentiveness and ability to focus in old age

Regular and intensive meditation sessions over the course of a lifetime could help a person remain attentive and focused well into old age. This...

Helping shatter the stigma of doctors' mental health problems

SIGECAPS is the mnemonic medical students memorise to learn the core symptoms of depression: sleep, interest, guilt, energy, concentration, appetite, psychomotor retardation, and suicidality....

'Boomerang generation' reduces parents' quality of life

Adult children who return to live with their parents, the so-called “boomerang generation”, cause a significant decline in parents' quality of life and well-being,...

Holding a loved one's hand helps to diminish pain

Simply holding hands with a comforting partner will synchronise not only breathing and heart rate, but also brain wave patterns, accompanied with a decrease...

Sibling bullying triples risk of later psychotic disorders

People who were bullied by siblings during childhood are up to three times more likely to develop psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia in early...

Positive views on ageing protect against dementia even among the high-risk

Older adults who acquired positive beliefs about old age from their surrounding culture are less likely to develop dementia, according to a Yale study....

Conspiracy theorists more likely to be anti-vaxxers

People who believe Princess Diana was murdered or that John F Kennedy's assassination was an elaborate plot are more likely to think that vaccines...

Prevalence of depression 'overestimated'

The common practice of using patient self-report screening questionnaires rather than diagnostic interviews conducted by researchers has resulted in overestimates of the prevalence of...

A romantic partner's scent helps lower stress levels

The scent of a romantic partner can help lower stress levels, research from the University of British Columbia has found. The study found women...

Selfitis — a genuine 'psychological complex'

‘Selfitis’ – the obsessive taking of selfies on mobile phones – appears to be a real psychological condition according to a UK-India study. Researchers at...

Heavy Facebook users treat online friends as 'digital objects'

If you're materialistic, you're likely to use Facebook more frequently and intensely. A German study reveals that materialistic people see and treat their Facebook...

The cognitive origins of religious belief

Previous studies have suggested people who hold strong religious beliefs are more intuitive and less analytical, and when they think more analytically their religious...

Traditional South American drug improving wellbeing

A psychedelic drug traditionally used in South America improves people's general sense of wellbeing and may offer a treatment for alcoholism and depression, new...

Poor academic performance a predictor of suicide risk

A Swedish study has shown that poor academic performance, measured as grade point average (GPA) at age 16, was a robust and strong predictor...

Concern as social media promotes 'bonespiration'

‘Bonespiration’ — the celebration of skeletal images of bodies featuring protruding bones and pencil-thin limbs — is being promoted on social media, University of...

Traumatic events take toll on heart, especially after menopause

A study on women demonstrates how traumatic experiences - defined as events such as sexual harassment, death of a child, being in a car accident...

Facial contrast causes women to look younger

Observers perceive women with increased facial contrast - how much the eyes, lips and eyebrows stand out in the face in terms of how...

Men finding 'bromances' more emotionally satisfying than romances

Young men's 'bromances,' close friendships with other men, are more emotionally satisfying than their romantic relationships with women, finds a small University of Winchester...

Gossip is essential for interpersonal relationships

Intrasexual competition positively predicted gossip frequency with women reporting a greater tendency to gossip in comparison to men, particularly about physical appearance and social...

Boys with psychopathic potential don't have contagious laughter urge

Boys who showed disruptive behaviour coupled with high levels of callous-unemotional traits reported less desire to join in with laughter than did normally behaved...

Effective interventions with suicide emergency department patients

Three simple interventions for follow up of patients identified as suicide risks in hospital emergency departments save lives and are cost-effective relative to usual...

Emoji fans take heart: Scientists pinpoint 27 states of emotion

A University of California Berkeley study challenges a long-held assumption in psychology that most human emotions fall within the universal categories of happiness, sadness,...

Using money to buy time is linked with greater happiness

13Money spent on buying free time rather than material goods is linked with greater life satisfaction,  but relatively few people, even among the wealthy,...

The long-term impact of spanking

Past research has indicated that physical punishment, such as spanking, has negative consequences on child development. However, most research studies have examined short-term associations...

Mindfulness training helps reduce the pain experience

Mindfulness training and hypnotic suggestion significantly reduced acute pain, experienced by hospital patients, similar to what one might expect from an opioid painkiller. After...

Longer oestrogen exposure reduces depression risk in menopause

Longer duration of oestrogen exposure from the start of menstruation until the onset of menopause was significantly associated with a reduced risk of depression...

Just thinking one is less active than peers, increases premature death risk

People who think they are less active than others in a similar age bracket die younger than those who believe they are more active,...

ACE's role in opioid addiction and later higher healthcare usage

Physical, sexual or emotional abuse as a child, or other childhood stresses, can lead to higher levels of health service use throughout adulthood, found...

Depression doubles stroke risk

Persistent depression may double the risk of stroke in adults over 50 – and stroke risk remains higher even after symptoms of depression go away, according to Harvard research.

The dark side to perfectionists

The type of perfectionist who sets impossibly high standards for others has a bit of a dark side. They tend to be narcissistic, antisocial and to have an aggressive sense of humour.

The money or the cigarette?

Financial incentive programmes help smokers quit more than providing free behavioural counselling and nicotine replacement therapy. 

Canadian attention span now worse than a goldfish

goldfish

In the digital age, where the news is limited to 140 characters and conversations take place in the form of emojis, attention span has shortened. Medical Daily reports that a recent study of Canadians by Microsoft found that the human attention span has shortened from 12 seconds to eight seconds in more than a decade. That’s a second shorter than the proverbial goldfish.

Omega-3 reduces child antisocial behaviour

A Perelman study suggests that the omega-3 fatty acid may have long-term neuro-developmental effects that reduce antisocial and aggressive behaviour in children.

Debate around 'excited delirium' diagnosis

Police, medical examiners and some doctors say 'excited delirium' is real and frightening, reports the Washington Post. Influenced by mental illness or the use of such stimulants, those in its grip often have extraordinary strength, are impervious to pain and act wildly or violently. Then, suddenly, some die. But others say it is merely a cover for the use of excessive force by law enforcement.

The long-lasting effects of bullying

Bullying adversely affects children in later life more than being maltreated, according to research from the University of Warwick.

Parent training to manage autism tantrums

Young children with autism spectrum disorder showed improved behaviour when their parents were trained with strategies to manage tantrums, aggression, self-injury, and non-compliance, a parent study by Yale and Emory universities found.

Joint custody the good choice

Parental separation or divorce is linked to a heightened risk of child psychosomatic problems, indicates Swedish research. But joint custody seems to be less problematic than sole custody.

Depression no predictor of violent behaviour

Most psychiatric disorders – including depression – do not predict future violent behaviour, according to a Northwestern Medicine longitudinal study of delinquent youth, which found the only exception to be substance abuse and dependence.