Thursday, 28 October, 2021
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Talking Points

Outrage over 'disinterested' Mugabe's WHO appointment justified — columnist

Typhoid and cholera are never far from the headlines in Zimbabwe, writes Dianna Games, CEO of Africa @ Work in a Business Day column. She...

Mugabe's brief appointment as WHO ambassador may have been quid pro quo

Kerry Cullinan, managing editor of Health-e News writes that she has been trying to understand why World Health Organisation (WHO) director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus...

UK refuses inquiry into a 'health scandal worse than thalidomide'

The UK government has refused to hold a public inquiry into the use of vaginal mesh implants which medical experts have described as a...

Sugar tax is not the only solution to SA's obesity crisis

Obesity threatens us with an alarming and bizarre statistic: within the next four years the number of obese people on the planet could outnumber...

Nerve stimulation restores some consciousness after 15 years of PVS

A 35-year-old man who had been in a persistent vegetative state (PVS) for 15 years has shown signs of consciousness after receiving a pioneering...

Be wary of medical messiahs with promises of salvation

Scientific pioneer, superstar surgeon, miracle worker – that’s how Paolo Macchiarini was known for several years. Dressed in a white lab coat or in...

‘Oversight failures and greed’ drive SA’s medical litigation explosion

SA public sector medical malpractice claims often stem from 'failures of management and oversight of clinical care, while the in the private sector, greed...

Regulation 8: An access guarantee or a blank cheque?

It is time to curb excessive costs, before it kills both the private health sector and the country’s medical schemes, writes Susan Erasmus on Fin24....

Health Department: 'Innuendo? What innuendo?'

The National Department of Health has defended a She Conquers campaign billboard next to the N1 in Johannesburg after accusations that it contained sexual...

Fury from LGBT rights groups over facial recognition study

A facial recognition experiment that claims to be able to distinguish between gay and heterosexual people has sparked a row between its creators and...

Indian doctors hurl abuse at each other in operating theatre

Two doctors have been caught on video hurling abuse at each other inside an Indian operating theatre as they conducted an emergency C-section which...

NICE guidelines on endometriosis: Diagnosis will improve, treatment won't

The UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence’s new guidelines on endometriosis will be transformative in enabling women to circumvent years of unnecessary suffering, writes...

SA challenged to face 'hard truths' on drug abuse prejudices – Global Commission

South Africa has taken a lead in the HIV response, but HIV won’t be overcome until the country faces some hard truths about drug...

New studies show critical impact of behaviour on dementia risk

17A wealth of new data, assembled in a Lancet Commission report, suggests that behaviour can have a significant impact on the risk of getting...

Disembowelling SA's private healthcare system

"Health tourism" by African leaders has been criticised by South Africa’s health minister. While the self-serving hypocrisy of leaders who have destroyed their countries’...

Uptake of healthcare mediation is slow, but Gauteng Health launches pilot project

Although the take up of healthcare mediation has been slow, the SA Medico-Legal Association (Samla) has announced that Gauteng Health will go ahead with a proposal...

Claims that sugar as addictive as cocaine described as 'absurd'

A review in the British Journal of Sports Medicine suggesting that sugar should be considered an addictive substance, and could even be on a...

Concerns that the NHI could be 'captured' by powerful vested interests

The shaping of SA's proposed National Health Insurance will be dominated by powerful groups with vested interests in health care: the corporate private sector, technocrats, and...

Pill fatigue, dating and mental health when HIV+

Professor Francois Venter, the deputy executive director, at the Wits Institute for Sexual & Reproductive Health HIV and Related Diseases writes in Spotlight on...

Gene-edited piglets opening door to animal organ transplants

In a striking advance that helps open the door to organ transplants from animals, researchers have created gene-edited piglets cleansed of viruses that might...

NHS ends funding of homeopathic and herbal medicines

Homeopathic and herbal remedies will no longer be funded under the British National Health Service because they are a 'misuse of scarce funds' University...

The death of Charlie Gard leaves a legacy of thorny questions

Charlie Gard, the incurably ill British infant who died recently, could not hear, see or even cry. But, reports The New York Times, his...

New guidelines on life-prolonging treatments

The American Thoracic Society aimed has released new guidelines for crucial decision-making for the care of patients with advanced critical illness while preventing conflicts between medical staff and family caregivers.

Debate on long-term psychiatric drug use

The benefits of psychiatric drugs have been exaggerated and the harms underplayed due to poor trial designs, argues one expert. But another expert and a patient contend that the evidence supports the use of these drugs, in a debate on the pages of The British Medical Journal.

The pseudoscience of beauty products.

beautyproducts.jpgThe beauty industry is massive, a huge cultural force in a tight, symbiotic relationship with celebrities and the celebrity-oriented media. So by its very nature, it creates massive problems for anyone seeking to get to the truth about the products it makes and promotes, writes Prof Timothy Caulfield of the School of Public Health at the University of Alberta, in The Atlantic.

Dr Google may trigger ‘cyberchondria'

Google.jpg Major search engines are providing irrelevant information that could lead to incorrect self-diagnosis, self-treatment and ultimately possible harm, research has found. Google reports that one in 20 of its 100bn searches a month was for health-related information. Some 35% of US adults go online to self-diagnose a medical condition.

Debate around 'excited delirium' diagnosis

Police, medical examiners and some doctors say 'excited delirium' is real and frightening, reports the Washington Post. Influenced by mental illness or the use of such stimulants, those in its grip often have extraordinary strength, are impervious to pain and act wildly or violently. Then, suddenly, some die. But others say it is merely a cover for the use of excessive force by law enforcement.

Münchausen by internet — how one woman fooled millions

Gibson.jpegAustralian blogger Belle Gibson has been exposed for fabricating a tragic cancer story that brought her fame and riches: various publishing contracts and large donations to a ‘charity’ which she plundered. But Gibson’s strange behaviour is not that unusual – faking disease in return for online fame is now a recognised medical condition.

Concerns over 'deprioritising' of medical research

Concerns are being raised  over new models of medical education in the US in which research plays a minimal role,  as being likely to create a two-tiered system of education, decrease the physician-scientist pipeline and diminish the application of scientific advances to patient care.

'You can't outrun a bad diet' – BMJ experts

Regular exercise is key to staving off serious disease, such as diabetes, heart disease, and dementia, write experts in an editorial in the British Medical Journal, but calorie laden diets now generate more ill health than physical inactivity, alcohol, and smoking combined.